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Using a BU35 Cantilever Clamp model to demonstrate degrees of freedom

gaby_rochinogaby_rochino Moderator, Onshape Employees Posts: 42
edited November 2018 in Higher Education Projects

This project is perfect for students who are improving their foundational CAD skills. The concepts covered in this project include:

  • Mate Connectors

  • Manipulating part position with the triad

  • Explaining Mates and Relations

  • Animating Mates

  • Applying limits to a Mate

Link to project instructions: Click here

Link to related Onshape public documents: Click here


Grade level: 12th grade and up

Duration: 2 hours

Onshape features: Assemblies
2
2 votes

Under Review · Last Updated

Comments

  • kate_leipold_ritkate_leipold_rit Member Posts: 11 EDU
    I've used the Clamp to demonstrate assembly techniques, but also for part drawings and an assembly drawing.  
    The biggest issue I ran into with the part drawings is the lack of a good front view coming from the part model.  I used the normal view, and creating named views to work around it, but it's an unfortunate downside to using this particular project. 
  • brian_bradybrian_brady Member, Developers Posts: 395 EDU
    I've used the Clamp to demonstrate assembly techniques, but also for part drawings and an assembly drawing.  
    The biggest issue I ran into with the part drawings is the lack of a good front view coming from the part model.  I used the normal view, and creating named views to work around it, but it's an unfortunate downside to using this particular project. 
    @kate_leipold_rit You can rotate a view in the view properties dialog. If you set an angle for the arms when you created the parts in the part studio, then use the measured angle to rotate the first view then project other views.
  • john_mcclaryjohn_mcclary Member, Developers Posts: 1,851 PRO
    Funny thing is the youtube videos I saw when they used those parts as a demonstration are what really got me interested in Onshape to begin with.
    The work flows showcased in those models took me from laughing at Onshape as the "Yea right, web browser CAD LOL, get real" to "Holy crap... that's.. not bad.." (subscribed)
  • kate_leipold_ritkate_leipold_rit Member Posts: 11 EDU
    @kate_leipold_rit You can rotate a view in the view properties dialog. If you set an angle for the arms when you created the parts in the part studio, then use the measured angle to rotate the first view then project other views.
    True.  I thought the normal named view was a really good work around, and it makes freshmen think about what is being shown in a good front view.  I also really dislike typing in values that can change and throw things off.  I want as much to come from the model intent as possible. 

    A view normal option in the drawing environment would solve it! 
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