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New Feature: 3D Printed Hole

Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,426 PRO
edited January 4 in General
I finally made time over the holidays to knock out a feature I'd been wanting to write for a while. It automates the process of converting round holes to a droplet shape so they 3D print cleanly without support material. I made a video tour here to show off all the bells and whistles. Go get the feature here. Let me know what you think!
It does this to holes:


Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
Website: ovyl.io

Comments

  • MichaelPascoeMichaelPascoe Member Posts: 876 PRO
    Yess!  Thanks @Evan_Reese

  • matthew_stacymatthew_stacy Member Posts: 362 PRO
    Nice work @Evan_Reese!  Can you offer any guidance on how much 'tear-dropping' is required to maintain clearance for a round pin?  I realize that there are a gazillion variables involved from printer and material characteristics to hole size and orientation. 

    But if you were looking for minimal modification on a Ø1/4" hole, perpendicular to the build-direction what would you recommend?
  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,426 PRO
    I'll probably just leave the Overhang Angle at 45° pretty much always, and then not think too much about how tilted the holes are or aren't since the feature automatically adjusts the amount of tear-dropping for you based on the hole angle. You still need to design the hole with some clearance to the shaft before using this feature. I'd probably start with 0.2mm for a rigid connection or something like 0.5mm for something meant to slide, but if I wanted to dial it in I'd do a test print with lots of holes slight variations in clearance to find the best one. Did that answer the question you asked?
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
  • matthew_stacymatthew_stacy Member Posts: 362 PRO
    I'll probably just leave the Overhang Angle at 45° pretty much always, and then not think too much about how tilted the holes are or aren't since the feature automatically adjusts the amount of tear-dropping for you based on the hole angle. You still need to design the hole with some clearance to the shaft before using this feature. I'd probably start with 0.2mm for a rigid connection or something like 0.5mm for something meant to slide, but if I wanted to dial it in I'd do a test print with lots of holes slight variations in clearance to find the best one. Did that answer the question you asked?

    Answered.  Thanks @Evan_Reese.
  • mahirmahir Member, Developers Posts: 1,213 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Nice. I've never even seen that type of hole for 3D printing. But I could have definitely made use of it and will do so in the future.
  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,426 PRO
    I like it. I'm not sure if it's the first place I learned about it, but Angus from Maker's Muse explains it well. It's not just about overhang angles, it's also about how it's hard to approximate a round hole by slicing it into layers.
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
  • sebastian_glanznersebastian_glanzner Member, Developers, Simulation EVP Posts: 241 PRO
    @Evan_Reese
    Thanks for the amazing Feature-Script! 
    I just used it in a print  :)
  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,426 PRO
    @Evan_Reese
    Thanks for the amazing Feature-Script! 
    I just used it in a print  :)
    Nice! glad it was useful
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
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