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Multi Mate Question

larry_haweslarry_hawes Member Posts: 399 PRO
edited March 24 in Drawings
Hopefully the video is clear enough...I realized I misspoke in the vid and would like the existing pivot point to move 'up' and 'down' along another defined mate. Perhaps a pin slot mate without a pin or a slot?

Thank you  



https://cad.onshape.com/documents/0dd919364bea73b4a5c650fc/w/b19bfa3dc83ba92b6d837a1d/e/ad47e498f0f51bda806bc389

Best Answer

  • larry_haweslarry_hawes Posts: 399 PRO
    Accepted Answer
    Question wasn't as clear as it could have been but discovered the 'limits' in the planer mate gave me the motion I was looking for. Thanks very much.


Answers

  • jakeramsleyjakeramsley Member, Moderator, Onshape Employees, Developers Posts: 583
    Hi larry_hawes,

    If I am understanding correct, you want the mate to be able to rotate about the blue axis up to the limits of the box as well as traverse along the blue axis to the top and bottom of the box?  If so, you don't need to do multiple mates and can use a cylindrical mate (https://cad.onshape.com/help/Content/mate-cylindrical.htm).

    In essence:
    1. Mates align and orientate Mate connectors to one another.
    2. Mate connectors can be thought of as local co-ordinate systems.  They follow the convention of x-y-z is equal to rbg (red, green, blue).
    3. A revolute mate will relate two Mate connectors so that they have the same origin but are able to rotate about the z-axis (or blue axis) of both.  They will not allow for any kind of relative translation.
    4. A cylindrical mate will relate two Mate connectors so that they are aligned about the same z-axis (or blue axis) but also allow for rotation about the common z-axis.  These all for both rotation and translation.

    If you have more questions about assemblies, I recommend taking our Onshape Assemblies self-paced course which is available here: https://learn.onshape.com/courses/fundamentals-onshape-assemblies.  It will take you through the fundamentals of inserting, instancing, and mating assemblies.
    Jake Ramsley

    Director of Quality Engineering              onshape.com
  • larry_haweslarry_hawes Member Posts: 399 PRO
    Accepted Answer
    Question wasn't as clear as it could have been but discovered the 'limits' in the planer mate gave me the motion I was looking for. Thanks very much.


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