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Rotate a whole sketch to a specific angle without adding a bunch of constraints?

jim_griesmerjim_griesmer Member Posts: 10
Hi, I have a sketch that represents a contour that I spent a good amount of time on to get right to match how I'm going to use it, but in the end I ended up with a sketch I'd like to rotate to a more "friendly" position on the front plane. In other words, I want the same shape defined, but the two circled lines should be horizontal. Is there a simple way to do this other than going over this whole sketch and setting a bunch of constraints, then rotating? 

Thanks!


Best Answers

  • BenTaylorBenTaylor Member Posts: 31 PRO
    Answer ✓
    The Transform tool is what you're looking for. Here's a breakdown of how to do it:

    Ben Taylor
    Biomechanical Engineer - Healing Innovations
  • matthew_stacymatthew_stacy Member Posts: 361 PRO
    Answer ✓
    @jim_griesmer the answer to your question, what would a fully constrained sketch look like for a shape like this, depends entirely on what you sketched and how you want it to behave (or there's the snarky answer - BLACK / no blue).

    Think of constraints as words to express design intent.  Rather than applying a gazillion dimensions, apply geometric constraints (tangent, perpendicular, equal, etc.).  Think about how the sketch needs to function.  Strive to constrain your sketch in such a way that you can edit it (to change size or shape) by changing as few dimensions as possible.  Perhaps symmetry is an aspect of your intent.  Strive to encode the design logic into your sketch so that you don't have to edit 17 dimensions just to make a minor change.  If you do it well, other designers will see your constraints and intuitively understand your DESIGN INTENT.

    A few well placed construction lines may also prove to be worth their weight in gold.

Answers

  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,426 PRO
    look for the sketch transform tool
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
  • BenTaylorBenTaylor Member Posts: 31 PRO
    Answer ✓
    The Transform tool is what you're looking for. Here's a breakdown of how to do it:

    Ben Taylor
    Biomechanical Engineer - Healing Innovations
  • jim_griesmerjim_griesmer Member Posts: 10
    Ah, Ben. Yes, this is actually what I figured out how to do myself. It feels a little clunky to have to copy and paste an angle value for a rotation, but it certainly works and I'm happy with it. :) Thank you!
  • matthew_stacymatthew_stacy Member Posts: 361 PRO
    @jim_griesmer, constraint is a virtue in engineering.  If you don't constrain that sketch it is likely only a matter of time until it bites you.  I would strongly encourage your to consider applying sketch constraints, then temporarily FIX one vertex.  At which point you can drag to rotate, or apply horizontal/vertical constraint to the line segment of your choosing.
  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,426 PRO
    @jim_griesmer, constraint is a virtue in engineering.  If you don't constrain that sketch it is likely only a matter of time until it bites you.  I would strongly encourage your to consider applying sketch constraints, then temporarily FIX one vertex.  At which point you can drag to rotate, or apply horizontal/vertical constraint to the line segment of your choosing.
    👆 this is sage advice
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
  • jim_griesmerjim_griesmer Member Posts: 10
    Thanks Evan and Matthew. I totally agree. Though in this case it was just annoying me that the sketch was angled in a direction that doesn't really matter in the end. The relative constraints are certainly important, but just to ease my OCD I wanted to "straighten" the entire sketch. There actually is another sketch that will go along with this one. That one was at a weird angle to because I drew them separately. This was about just making them kinda make sense in relation to each other. THEN fix the constraints. At least that was my plan. 
  • jim_griesmerjim_griesmer Member Posts: 10
    Actually on that last note, I'm curious what a fully constrained sketch would look like for a shape like this. Since there are so many curves and such it seems that it would be just full of dimensions. I suppose this is necessary, but given my newness to this stuff, I'm wondering what "normal" would look like for a shape like this. Note that I am a software engineer, but mechanical, drafting, etc is brand spankin' new to me. 
  • matthew_stacymatthew_stacy Member Posts: 361 PRO
    Answer ✓
    @jim_griesmer the answer to your question, what would a fully constrained sketch look like for a shape like this, depends entirely on what you sketched and how you want it to behave (or there's the snarky answer - BLACK / no blue).

    Think of constraints as words to express design intent.  Rather than applying a gazillion dimensions, apply geometric constraints (tangent, perpendicular, equal, etc.).  Think about how the sketch needs to function.  Strive to constrain your sketch in such a way that you can edit it (to change size or shape) by changing as few dimensions as possible.  Perhaps symmetry is an aspect of your intent.  Strive to encode the design logic into your sketch so that you don't have to edit 17 dimensions just to make a minor change.  If you do it well, other designers will see your constraints and intuitively understand your DESIGN INTENT.

    A few well placed construction lines may also prove to be worth their weight in gold.

  • bruce_williamsbruce_williams Member, Developers Posts: 835 PRO
    @matthew_stacy
    I love the word analogy of communication for others and our future selves.  Great post!
    www.accuratepattern.com
  • jim_griesmerjim_griesmer Member Posts: 10
    Thank you Matthew! Great answer!
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