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Help with replicating this object in Onshape

marty_lawrencemarty_lawrence Member Posts: 8 EDU
Just wondering whether anyone might be able to help with an object I am trying to replicate. A video of how you solve would be really helpful if possible.
I have uploaded an image of what I am trying to copy.
In particular I am having trouble with the handle where it meets the pan.
I suspect I might not be reading this drawing correctly. There is some dimensions given that I cannot understand their purpose or make work (ie. 18mm & 7mm)
I can share my attempt on onshape if needed
This drawing comes from studycadcam.blogspot.com

Comments

  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,489 PRO
    Hey @marty_lawrence
    I think lots of folks here, myself included, would enjoy helping you out here if you have a more specific question. For example, "I'm struggling to make this one blend work, and here's what i've already tried. what am I doing wrong?" is a lot better than, "how do I model this?", which is too broad. The best way I've seen to get feedback and help is if you can post a public document where you've been trying things, so people can copy it, and include some screenshots of the area you're stuck on. Bonus points if you mark it up with what you want it to look like.
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
  • marty_lawrencemarty_lawrence Member Posts: 8 EDU
    Thanks for the reply.

    I thought I was fairly specific. Anyway, like i said, I can't seem to get the handle right. Specifically where it meets the pan. Basically I am trying to replicate what I see in the drawing that I shared.

    There is a couple of dimensions given in the drawing which I am unsure of what they are refering (the 7mm & the 18mm - there is only one instance of each of these dimesions for the handle).
    I suspect I am not reading the drawing correctly. If someone could model from the same drawing, I could learn from what you do. My whole purpose of replicating these types of drawings is so I can learn. Later i can pass my knowledge on to my students.

    Here's the model I did. But its not quite right. As you can see with my solution, I would be unable to fillet.

    https://cad.onshape.com/documents/0be170a07c8620d1d949e3e2/w/9d2b53d5f96a25ba27dd7bd7/e/79ed7de4579fb7f335618441?renderMode=0&uiState=62233b26949a6f183610eb18

  • steve_shubinsteve_shubin Member Posts: 852 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 7
    @marty_lawrence

    First — the handle



    IN THE PHOTO ABOVE, the sides of the handle look VERTICAL, right up to where it connects to the pan



    ABOVE, you’ll see three different colored lines here where I’ve marked things up

    Where the yellow line is, in that very first picture up above, that area looks vertical to me



    Now directly above, this is what you have modeled. This does not look like what I see in the pictures



    OK so above, the area that I’ve highlighted in yellow. That particular area does not reflect what I see in the pictures







    Regarding the two pictures above
    The first of those pictures I believe is a bottom view
    The second picture is a close-up

    I believe that that area highlighted in red, is only with regards to the part of the handle that is thicker — where it connects to the pan

    Now the 7mm dimension — well that looks like some type of a depression on the bottom side possibly where your finger is supposed to go

    But you have to wonder. This is a cast iron skillet. Depending upon what you’re cooking you may have to use either a mitt or some type of a pad to hold that pan so your hand doesn’t get burnt especially if you’re frying something like a ribeye steak in it, where you have the fire cranked up

    So how good is a depression gonna be on the underside of a pan if you’re using a mitt. So I don’t know what to make of that 7mm dimension

    As far as the 18 mm
    I would probably scale it off the end of the handle to locate where that is supposed to be

    or if I can get a hold of the person that drew those plans, I’d probably call them up and say you wanna give me a dimension for how far you want it off the end of the handle?  otherwise I’m gonna scale it

    And there was no way for me to copy your drawing. I could only view it. So there was no way I was going to be able to play with it for what that’s worth

  • marty_lawrencemarty_lawrence Member Posts: 8 EDU
    Thanks Steve,
    I have noticed all that you indicated as well.
    When I modelled the radius that meets the handle, i couldnt get it to stay vertical like in the image. It would either splay out or splay in as I tried a few different things. My last attempt is what I shared and it was the closest I could get trying to match the dimensions I was given.
    Do I need to change permisions so you can edit? Is that safe to do on a public forum?
  • marty_lawrencemarty_lawrence Member Posts: 8 EDU
    And I agree that is probablty a bottom view of the pan which doesnt seem to match the image. I think a rendered image from the underside might have been helpful.

  • steve_shubinsteve_shubin Member Posts: 852 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 7
    Do I need to change permisions so you can edit? Is that safe to do on a public forum?
    Others here in the forum are better informed on how this works

    Typically when I make a document up as a hobbyist, I just post the URL here in the forum and that’s it. I don’t tweak any user document permissions or sharing set up before posting the URL

    Once in a while I share a document with a retired engineer friend of mine, who also uses Onshape as a hobby. And when I do that, I go in and set the permissions so that he can VIEW and COPY the document, but that’s it,

    That way if he wants to play with the document he’ll be playing with his own copy that he can modify any way he wants, and it won’t be affecting my model 

  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,489 PRO
    Here's me taking 15-20 minutes to try it out. I didn't follow the drawing exactly but there might still be some techniques that are helpful. There's a link below to the public document.


    https://cad.onshape.com/documents/c138041c4fb1589d5f2a709e/w/f9fd94eb4bbdebeea0245dce/e/dc0a3faba65fb28582f9e982
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
  • marty_lawrencemarty_lawrence Member Posts: 8 EDU
    Thanks for the reply.

    I thought I was fairly specific. Anyway, like i said, I can't seem to get the handle right. Specifically where it meets the pan. Basically I am trying to replicate what I see in the drawing that I shared.

    There is a couple of dimensions given in the drawing which I am unsure of what they are refering (the 7mm & the 18mm - there is only one instance of each of these dimesions for the handle).
    I suspect I am not reading the drawing correctly. If someone could model from the same drawing, I could learn from what you do. My whole purpose of replicating these types of drawings is so I can learn. Later i can pass my knowledge on to my students.

    Here's the model I did. But its not quite right. As you can see with my solution, I would be unable to fillet.

    https://cad.onshape.com/documents/0be170a07c8620d1d949e3e2/w/9d2b53d5f96a25ba27dd7bd7/e/79ed7de4579fb7f335618441?renderMode=0&uiState=62233b26949a6f183610eb18

  • marty_lawrencemarty_lawrence Member Posts: 8 EDU
    edited March 10
    Thanks Evan,
    Thats an interesting way to draw the pan.
    Out of curiosity, Why did you choose to draw half the pan & then mirror at the end? What is the advantage of doing it that way?
    And what is a multi mirror?
    Also in your sketch3 you used a mate connector as the sketch plane. How & why did you do it that way? What is the difference with just offsetting a new plane & then using that for your sketch?
    Sorry about these questions but I'm just trying to learn.
    Your solution actually ended up looking like one of my early attempts. I ended up not being happy that the handle didnt seem to meet like in the image, so I tried again and again.
    Maybe I'm just being to anal about trying to match all the dimensions exactly
  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,489 PRO
    I like modeling anything symmetrical in halves for a few reasons:
    1. it computes faster since you're not duplicating operations. I put as much before the mirror as possible.
    2. it's faster to do, since you're not manually selecting as many things in the process
    3. it leaves no room for symmetry errors. If you're manually duplicating options symmetrically, you might miss a spot
    I used a mate connector to offset the sketch so I could find the intersection with the pan. You could just use an offset plane, but I find I prefer to reserve plane creation for only planes I will use more than once, and favor using mate connectors on the fly for one-offs. It keeps the feature tree and model cleaner. Here's the help doc on mate connectors. For the sketch I used an "implicit mate connector"

    Multi-mirror is a feature I wrote that simplifies mirroring multiple parts across multiple planes. For the pan, it doesn't matter much because it's one part and one plane, but if you right-click the feature and select "open linked document" you can see some of my examples where it's better. I tend to use it even on simple things in case I ever add more complexity, because it's not easy to swap a standard mirror for multi-mirror later.

    Whether you're being too picky about the model is up to you and your goals. If the goal is make a pretty good pan, then you may be. If the goal is to match something exactly for practice, then it can be worth being stubborn about. I will say some of the ways that pan is dimensioned seem funny to me. For example, I see no reason why the whole thing shouldn't have an equal wall thickness, but the bottom is shown at 4mm and the sidewall shows 3.72mm, which feels more like a rounding error than a functional consideration. This made me assume it was a drawing made after the fact from someone's improvised model, and that the author of the drawing and author of the original model might be different people. Not sure, but it signaled to me that I should consider taking some creative license, and making some assumptions about design intent.
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
  • marty_lawrencemarty_lawrence Member Posts: 8 EDU
    Well Thanks Evan,
    I've learned a few things. I think it makes sense to mirror like you've done. I'll try to apply that to my drawings as I can see it would reduce your workload a bit.
    I appreciate your help
  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 1,489 PRO
    Glad I could be helpful.
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
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