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Is it possible to replicate a solid that has been plastic dipped (say 1mm thick)

derek_westwoodderek_westwood Member Posts: 34 ✭✭
https://cad.onshape.com/documents/1a7f71611062f9ed9f63a8bd/w/d911a6517cde51e624d9da6e/e/edd1de9d85480994137d0085
I want to "plastic dip" this dumbell do I have to model it as surfaces and offset them?
Thanks Derek
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Best Answer

  • eric_pestyeric_pesty Member Posts: 1,395 PRO
    Answer ✓
    Select the whole part (hide others and box select), then use offset surface with 0 for the offset value, then use the "thicken" on this surface

Answers

  • eric_pestyeric_pesty Member Posts: 1,395 PRO
    Answer ✓
    Select the whole part (hide others and box select), then use offset surface with 0 for the offset value, then use the "thicken" on this surface
  • derek_westwoodderek_westwood Member Posts: 34 ✭✭
    Thanks Eric.
  • matthew_stacymatthew_stacy Member Posts: 474 PRO
    @derek_westwood with regard to modeling the dumbell coating in your Part Studio, consider selecting NEW (rather than ADD) for thickening the zero-offset face.  That allows you to assign unique materials for core and coating to achieve more realistic mass properties.  You can then combine coating/core into a single "Composite Part".

    Also consider adding one or more Assemblies to your document.  Attempting to create the entire "assembly" in a Part Studio results in redundant parts:
    • Two identical dumbells
    • Four identical dowel pins
    Redundant parts tend to result in extra work and errors.  Imagine that you update the material of one dumbell.  That change will not automatically propagate from Part 1 to Part 3.  The "Onshape Assemblies" and "Introduction to Assembly Design" lessons in the learning center are great resources for getting started.  In general, avoid creating redundant parts.  Instead, insert multiple "Instances" of a single unique part into an assembly.  In many cases you can leverage the "Replicate" tool for even cleaner assemblies.  I reduced the part count from seven to four, with two of those being combined in a composite part.







      A few of these thoughts are incorporated in this revised model.

  • derek_westwoodderek_westwood Member Posts: 34 ✭✭
    Matthew, Thanks for a very comprehensive answer. Derek.
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