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Peak Stress Value

Dean_GardnerDean_Gardner Member Posts: 87 PRO
Is it possible to find the absolute peak stress value in simulation?  without going on a mouse journey...

Is it the figure to the right and left of the legend?  I.e. -80.4 and +80.16?  If so, why are they so far from the autoscale limits, -21.9 and 22.34?

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Best Answers

  • Matt_ShieldsMatt_Shields Member Posts: 182 PRO
    Answer ✓
    You can click the blue text and type in your own maximum.  Is 22.3 the largest it will let you type?

  • GregBrownGregBrown Member, Onshape Employees Posts: 93
    edited October 2023 Answer ✓
    There is a reason we automatically scale the legend to be something other than the absolute min/max of the results... And that is the (reality of the) presence of singularities in the model. In the case Matt shows above, the infinitely sharp corners of the triangle supports will cause stress singularities, and thus the theoretical max stress of infinity will not really be helpful to anyone. So we take a statistical analysis of the element stresses and determine what is the best max/min for the legend in order to give a decent visual representation. You of course need to verify the locations/reasons for singularities to be present, and you can of course adjust the legend to whatever values to like.

Answers

  • Matt_ShieldsMatt_Shields Member Posts: 182 PRO
    Yes, the peak stresses in your model are -80.4 MPa and 80.16 MPa.  The auto scale limits are set to make the best visual representation of stress.  If you have one stress hot spot in your model, and the scale was set by that outlier, then the rest of the model would be blue.
  • Dean_GardnerDean_Gardner Member Posts: 87 PRO
    edited October 2023
    Thanks Matt, unless i have missed something - it would be nice to be able to open up the scale to 80 Mpa, but it appears it max's out at those auto determined values and that the user can only narrow down the limits rather than widen them. Thus why it's difficult to see what you describe.
  • Dean_GardnerDean_Gardner Member Posts: 87 PRO
    Ah ha! It is possible..!
  • Matt_ShieldsMatt_Shields Member Posts: 182 PRO
    Answer ✓
    You can click the blue text and type in your own maximum.  Is 22.3 the largest it will let you type?

  • Dean_GardnerDean_Gardner Member Posts: 87 PRO
     Thank you.
  • GregBrownGregBrown Member, Onshape Employees Posts: 93
    edited October 2023 Answer ✓
    There is a reason we automatically scale the legend to be something other than the absolute min/max of the results... And that is the (reality of the) presence of singularities in the model. In the case Matt shows above, the infinitely sharp corners of the triangle supports will cause stress singularities, and thus the theoretical max stress of infinity will not really be helpful to anyone. So we take a statistical analysis of the element stresses and determine what is the best max/min for the legend in order to give a decent visual representation. You of course need to verify the locations/reasons for singularities to be present, and you can of course adjust the legend to whatever values to like.

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