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Help with plan of attack on part modeling

justin_martin524justin_martin524 Member Posts: 6
Since I am learning onshape and this part seems to have some geometry more advanced than my current skillset. I am wondering how others might attack modeling this part. I have started with half the base extrude and figured I'd just model half of it then mirror. I'm looking for opinions on where to go from here.
 

Best Answers

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    S1monS1mon Member Posts: 2,562 PRO
    Answer ✓
    Do you have the original part?
    Do you have access to a 3D scanner?
    How accurately do you need to reproduce this part?
    Is the back side of it flat, or is it mounted on a curved surface?
    Can you tell how the part was made? (if it's a casting or molding, there will have been draft angles involved which can inform the modeling)

    If I had the original part and a 3D scanner, I would want scan data as a reference for modeling. Without a 3D scanner, but if I had the part, I would take some careful photos as orthogonal as possible to all the major directions with a really long lens to avoid parallax errors. I would also take as many measurements as I could with calipers.

    There's a main shape which is a cylinder which tapers into a tear drop. Then there is a decorative element which is offset. Everything appears to be mirrored across the axis of the cylinder. I would probably start with the main shape first. It would use a surface modeling approach and focus on the more geometric aspects first to define the relationships between the round hole and what I assume is a mounting surface.
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    nick_papageorge073nick_papageorge073 Member, csevp Posts: 744 PRO
    Answer ✓
    This is the type of part that is surface modeled. It's too complicated to discuss here. If you want to model it, go to the training center and do all the courses on curves first, and then surfaces.(curves are used to build the surfaces). I think it's about 6 modules. Anything in the consumer space that is organic shaped, or "curvy", is surface modeled.

Answers

  • Options
    S1monS1mon Member Posts: 2,562 PRO
    Answer ✓
    Do you have the original part?
    Do you have access to a 3D scanner?
    How accurately do you need to reproduce this part?
    Is the back side of it flat, or is it mounted on a curved surface?
    Can you tell how the part was made? (if it's a casting or molding, there will have been draft angles involved which can inform the modeling)

    If I had the original part and a 3D scanner, I would want scan data as a reference for modeling. Without a 3D scanner, but if I had the part, I would take some careful photos as orthogonal as possible to all the major directions with a really long lens to avoid parallax errors. I would also take as many measurements as I could with calipers.

    There's a main shape which is a cylinder which tapers into a tear drop. Then there is a decorative element which is offset. Everything appears to be mirrored across the axis of the cylinder. I would probably start with the main shape first. It would use a surface modeling approach and focus on the more geometric aspects first to define the relationships between the round hole and what I assume is a mounting surface.
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    justin_martin524justin_martin524 Member Posts: 6
    edited June 20
    duplicate message. sorry
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    justin_martin524justin_martin524 Member Posts: 6
    Hi S1mon, thanks for the reply.
    Yes I have part in hand.
    No 3D scanner although thinking about buying one soon
    Needs to be accurate enough to look at for the naked eye at 1/2 scale. not for tolerancing or anything special.... no holes needed just solid
    backside will be just solid flat
    its molded metal not draft angle needed. its cosmetic and will be cnc machined replica
     I am using calipers for measurements.

    Here is how far I've gotten so far. 3 loft features so far. 1 for rib on top and 1 for the sloping curve and 1 for joining that to the slanted flat surface. If I can fill in that hole yet it's practically done except for filleting and mirror. The one thing I don't like is the way this fillet circled in red ends up being slanted instead of more perpendicular to the surface. Not sure what I can do there.


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    nick_papageorge073nick_papageorge073 Member, csevp Posts: 744 PRO
    Answer ✓
    This is the type of part that is surface modeled. It's too complicated to discuss here. If you want to model it, go to the training center and do all the courses on curves first, and then surfaces.(curves are used to build the surfaces). I think it's about 6 modules. Anything in the consumer space that is organic shaped, or "curvy", is surface modeled.
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    justin_martin524justin_martin524 Member Posts: 6
    Thank you Nick for that input. I struggled to grasp the surfacing tools (Never surface modeled before) without formal coursework but made some headway with random youtube vids. Ended up with a hybrid approach of solids and surfaces. I'll have to do the coursework for more in depth understanding of surfacing. Here's what I ended up with. Looks pretty close.
     
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    nick_papageorge073nick_papageorge073 Member, csevp Posts: 744 PRO
    That actually looks really good! Nice job for your first attempt.
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