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Putting channels inside a rectangular prism

samuel_chen430samuel_chen430 Member Posts: 6 EDU
How do I cut cylindrical channels inside a rectangular prism? Am I able to create planes inside the rectangular prism and work on those planes?

Comments

  • NeilCookeNeilCooke Moderator, Onshape Employees Posts: 2,087
    Can you give an example? Image?
    Neil Cooke, Director of Technical Marketing, Onshape Inc.
  • samuel_chen430samuel_chen430 Member Posts: 6 EDU

  • NeilCookeNeilCooke Moderator, Onshape Employees Posts: 2,087
    Take a look at Sweep - you can sketch the path in the plan view and sweep a circle along each path. 
    Neil Cooke, Director of Technical Marketing, Onshape Inc.
  • michael3424michael3424 Member Posts: 474 ✭✭✭
    Ooh - that looks like a microfluidic device.  If you don't mind my asking, how are you going to fabricate it?

    Just an amateur here, but you could create planes inside the prism and create your geometry from there.
  • samuel_chen430samuel_chen430 Member Posts: 6 EDU
    I am going to 3D print it with PETG material.
  • Otaola_FrancoOtaola_Franco Member Posts: 28 ✭✭
    I am going to 3D print it with PETG material.
    Instersting, i am working in a similar project, for microfluidics i highly recomend you a dlp printer, for the surface finish. is a university project or personal? or work?
  • samuel_chen430samuel_chen430 Member Posts: 6 EDU
    edited April 5
    @Otaola_Franco
    It's a university research project for a bioengineering lab. I don't know if I will have access to a dlp printer, are there other options for the surface finish?
    What kind of microfluidic device are you working on?
  • samuel_chen430samuel_chen430 Member Posts: 6 EDU
    edited April 3
    @dick_van_der_vaart
    Thanks! The file is really helpful!
  • samuel_chen430samuel_chen430 Member Posts: 6 EDU
    @NeilCooke @michael3424
    Thanks for the tips!
  • Otaola_FrancoOtaola_Franco Member Posts: 28 ✭✭
    @Otaola_Franco
    It's a university research project for a bioengineering lab. I don't know if I will have access to a dlp printer, are there other options for the surface finish?
    What kind of microfluidic device are you working on?
    super interesting man!. working in microreactors for heterogeneous reactions in flow chemistry :D. either way, if you want and need help in CAO I could help you don't hesitate to write me a private message :D
    for the surface finish if you stay in FDM technic, you have 3 big (or at least that i know) to solve this problem, first for all materials: a recovery yes I know it is obvious but well a recovery could help eihter way must look for one compatible with your experience. second and third they are similar with abs you can do a aceton vapor smooth (attention printing with abs is not recommended in closed rooms toxic fumes (in my university they do it either ahahah is not like you are going to die or get cancer in one day exposure) and the third is from polymaker only polymaker smooth filament or polysmooth as it can be "smooth" reeeeally easily with more control with their process. recommendation, look for a cheap DLP printer, actually anycubic is fuc&(uç cheap and you print the device cut it in two pieces, and before clean it from the residuals you put together the two of them and put it in the sun for like a day that way no supports inside your part ;). either way dont hesitate to write me, i am actually doing my phd with 3D printing in university of technology of compiegne, france. 
    good luck and happy printing (and one more recommendation, or something you should know,3D printing CAN AND WILL be frustrating at least for the first steps, it is a big learning curve. ahahah)
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