Welcome to the Onshape forum! Ask questions and join in the discussions about everything Onshape.

First time visiting? Here are some places to start:

  1. Looking for a certain topic? Check out the categories filter or use Search (upper right).
  2. Need support? Ask a question to our Community Support category.
  3. Please submit support tickets for bugs but you can request improvements in the Product Feedback category.
  4. Be respectful, on topic and if you see a problem, Flag it.

If you would like to contact our Community Manager personally, feel free to send a private message or an email.

shell vs thicken

gzgz Member Posts: 13
edited May 12 in Using Onshape
So can someone explain to me why shell works just fine most of the time, but thicken has a lot, lot, lot of issues?

Many times it's easier for me to draw the specs of something I want to enclose and then thicken around it instead of having to add the wall thickness to every.single.dimension in order to account for the shell command.

Comments

  • NeilCookeNeilCooke Moderator, Onshape Employees Posts: 2,088
    gz said:

    Many times it's easier for me to draw the specs of something I want to enclose and then thicken around it instead of having to add the wall thickness to every.single.dimension in order to account for the shell command.
    No idea what you mean here? Can you link an example? Perhaps flipping the shell might work for you. 

    Shell already has surrounding geometry to help it trim the offset faces nicely. Thicken just offsets all faces regardless. Again, no way tell what the problems are without an example 
    Neil Cooke, Director of Technical Marketing, Onshape Inc.
  • romeograhamromeograham Member Posts: 180 PRO
    One of the particular areas that causes issues with Thicken commands (in Onshape, SolidWorks, Creo - must be others too) is "what to do with the edges".

    In a surface model (or any model, for that matter) it's easy to have great geometry where the surface curvature around the "open" perimeter of the part is not continuous.  Since Thicken creates a surface body whose edge is perpendicular to the surface at every point, this means that the edges end up with complex geometry - often that can't get sorted out by Onshape.

    However, when you use Shell on an  enclosed body, you're giving a surface to use as the new edge, and eliminating most of that complex geometry.

    Often, this preserves design intent better, too.

    When creating an enclosure for electronics components or other things, you may find that using offset surfaces from your reference geometry (one feature) then dimensioning from that reference surface (for example) may reduce the amount of extra thinking you have to do in all your sketches.

    If I have time, I'll add some images or an example OS doc later.

    Happy Mother's Day to everyone!
Sign In or Register to comment.