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ISO 14581 and other missing screws in the standard library

We have been testing OnShape for a few weeks and it seems like there are a lot of generic screws missing from the screw library. Is there a plan to add common screw types like ISO 14581, DIN 7045 etc? 

As an addition it would be cool if the common Bossard screws were directly integrated like WN1452, Delta PT, among others?

In order to manage it a search field within the screw menu would be very welcome. 

There seems to be a lot of hanging requests in this thread as well: https://forum.onshape.com/discussion/comment/58533#Comment_58533

Comments

  • S1monS1mon Member Posts: 161 PRO
    You could vote for this request for Delta PT screws. https://forum.onshape.com/discussion/16739/add-delta-pt-screws-to-standard-library#latest

    The thread you linked has a lot of good ideas. Standard library upgrades and maintenance is at least one person’s full time job. Hopefully Onshape has someone or multiple people doing so.
  • Jason_SJason_S Moderator, Onshape Employees, Developers Posts: 194
    Hi, @Frederik_Skovgaard,

    I manage the standard content library for Onshape. Can you submit a ticket with a list of fasteners you and your team are looking for? We're working on something orthogonal to this now, but plan on getting back to standard content requests very soon. 

    As for specific supplier stuff, that is a bit more complicated (for every reason you can imagine). Generic standards are the best way to get these through the process.

    We are hoping to have a mechanism in the future to give your team the supplier-specific content you want, but the best way to manage these for now is shown here: https://learn.onshape.com/learn/article/best-practices-for-managing-custom-libraries 

    QA Engineer - Onshape, Inc.
  • Frederik_SkovgaardFrederik_Skovgaard Member Posts: 8
    Jason_S said:
    Hi, @Frederik_Skovgaard,

    I manage the standard content library for Onshape. Can you submit a ticket with a list of fasteners you and your team are looking for? We're working on something orthogonal to this now, but plan on getting back to standard content requests very soon. 

    As for specific supplier stuff, that is a bit more complicated (for every reason you can imagine). Generic standards are the best way to get these through the process.

    We are hoping to have a mechanism in the future to give your team the supplier-specific content you want, but the best way to manage these for now is shown here: https://learn.onshape.com/learn/article/best-practices-for-managing-custom-libraries 

    Hi Jason,
    Thanks for the reply. I think the most used ones in our industry are, ISO: 14581, 14583, 7046, 7045, 4762, DIN: 7500 (C & M), 7984

    I agree that the DIN and ISO standards are best. Bossard does have the WN1452 series of screws which are really common and close to being an industry standard. Also something which is getting used more and more is the BN 9524 type low head screws. 

    It would be really great if there was a search tool in the screw library part of OnShape for when you have a lo

    Is there a list somewhere where I can vote, I am brand new to OnShape and we will begin implementing it from January. Thore from OnShape just said to post here. 

    Best regards,
    Frederik
  • S1monS1mon Member Posts: 161 PRO
    @Jason_S,

    I've looked around for ISO or DIN standards for thread forming screws for plastics, and haven't found a good reference. However, consumer electronics, medical, automotive, etc. all use such screws. Onshape has PEM fasteners in the standard parts, despite them being proprietary. 

    When you do add such screws, please make sure they go down to at least M1. It's really frustrating that so much of the standard library for machine screws is all limited to >=M1.6. Has anyone not seen a cell phone, watch or eye glasses?

    McMaster sells M1-M6 Delta PT screws: https://www.mcmaster.com/screws/rounded-head-style~pan/stainless-steel-thread-forming-screws-for-thin-plastic/

    And McMaster has machine screws down to M0.5. https://www.mcmaster.com/screws/system-of-measurement~metric/thread-size~m0-5/

    McMaster has a very wide variety of parts, but they are far from a miniature hardware specialist.
  • Frederik_SkovgaardFrederik_Skovgaard Member Posts: 8
    Jason_S said:
    Hi, @Frederik_Skovgaard,

    I manage the standard content library for Onshape. Can you submit a ticket with a list of fasteners you and your team are looking for? We're working on something orthogonal to this now, but plan on getting back to standard content requests very soon. 

    As for specific supplier stuff, that is a bit more complicated (for every reason you can imagine). Generic standards are the best way to get these through the process.

    We are hoping to have a mechanism in the future to give your team the supplier-specific content you want, but the best way to manage these for now is shown here: https://learn.onshape.com/learn/article/best-practices-for-managing-custom-libraries 

    Hi Jason,
    Thanks for the reply. I think the most used ones in our industry are, ISO: 14581, 14583, 7046, 7045, 4762, DIN: 7500 (C & M), 7984

    I agree that the DIN and ISO standards are best. Bossard does have the WN1452 series of screws which are really common and close to being an industry standard. Also something which is getting used more and more is the BN 9524 type low head screws. 

    It would be really great if there was a search tool in the screw library part of OnShape for when you have a lo

    Is there a list somewhere where I can vote, I am brand new to OnShape and we will begin implementing it from January. Thore from OnShape just said to post here. 

    Best regards,
    Frederik
  • Frederik_SkovgaardFrederik_Skovgaard Member Posts: 8
    S1mon said:
    @Jason_S,

    I've looked around for ISO or DIN standards for thread forming screws for plastics, and haven't found a good reference. However, consumer electronics, medical, automotive, etc. all use such screws. Onshape has PEM fasteners in the standard parts, despite them being proprietary. 

    When you do add such screws, please make sure they go down to at least M1. It's really frustrating that so much of the standard library for machine screws is all limited to >=M1.6. Has anyone not seen a cell phone, watch or eye glasses?

    McMaster sells M1-M6 Delta PT screws: https://www.mcmaster.com/screws/rounded-head-style~pan/stainless-steel-thread-forming-screws-for-thin-plastic/

    And McMaster has machine screws down to M0.5. https://www.mcmaster.com/screws/system-of-measurement~metric/thread-size~m0-5/

    McMaster has a very wide variety of parts, but they are far from a miniature hardware specialist.
    Agreed, much of the industry here is using Delta PT type for plastics in the range you suggest and the for small subassemblies M1 machine thread is not complete unheard of. Bossards screws are pretty much a defacto standard here in Denmark in several of the biggest companies. While it is proprietary usually the documentation level is good enough to use in almost any industry (like ISO and DIN), most engineers trust Bossards white papers as much as their own tests. So I would be all for adding quite a few of Bossards screws in the library if Bossard is ok with it. 

    Of course this means having a lot more screws to choose from so they makes it even more useful to have a search function for screws.  
  • S1monS1mon Member Posts: 161 PRO
    My experience with consumer electronics is that we would start with downloading CAD from McMaster for screws, and then modify if absolutely necessary (e.g. custom head size, or non-typical length), then we would make a drawing with material, plating and critical dimensions and tolerances on it. We’d give the 2D and 3D to our team in China, and they or one of our CMs would source the screws. When you’re making 100k of something, you’re pretty much telling a screw vendor exactly what you want. They program their screw machine and make them. There is no off the shelf at that volume.

    Depending on the application, sometimes the CM will want the screws to be magnetic for ease of picking up for electric screwdrivers, and other times that may cause more trouble than it’s worth.

    Material and plating is one of the issues I see with the standard library. There are so many options, and some of them are regional (certain steel grades or plating materials are not common in some countries). To some extent I want the 3D to be independent of the material/plating specs.
  • Frederik_SkovgaardFrederik_Skovgaard Member Posts: 8
    S1mon said:
    My experience with consumer electronics is that we would start with downloading CAD from McMaster for screws, and then modify if absolutely necessary (e.g. custom head size, or non-typical length), then we would make a drawing with material, plating and critical dimensions and tolerances on it. We’d give the 2D and 3D to our team in China, and they or one of our CMs would source the screws. When you’re making 100k of something, you’re pretty much telling a screw vendor exactly what you want. They program their screw machine and make them. There is no off the shelf at that volume.

    Depending on the application, sometimes the CM will want the screws to be magnetic for ease of picking up for electric screwdrivers, and other times that may cause more trouble than it’s worth.

    Material and plating is one of the issues I see with the standard library. There are so many options, and some of them are regional (certain steel grades or plating materials are not common in some countries). To some extent I want the 3D to be independent of the material/plating specs.
    That is exactly the way we have it setup in our PDM right now. Screws geometry is fixed as per the standards but we add material specification afterwards, including grades, plating, special requirements. Hopefully something similar can be made in OnShape. 
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