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Hierarchy planning for animation

ramon_hammramon_hamm Member Posts: 9
 I want to make a toy with gears that will eventually animate, gears will mesh with with real ratios. Do I draw a gear, save, start a new part or sketch or assembly, draw another of which? (These are not exact copies, different tooth count per each 5 gears). I want to understand hierarchy of assembly vs part vs sketch etc. so I can eventually move 1 gear and see it all move. Any good tutorials for this? Thanks!

Best Answer

  • adamohernadamohern Posts: 216 PRO
    Accepted Answer
    The approach is up to you. You can model each gear in its own part studio if that works well for your workflow, or you can model them all in a single part studio. It doesn't matter which.

    Ultimately you'll just import the gears as individual Parts into an Assembly, mate them to their respective axes using revolute mates, and mate them to one another using Gear Relations. The Gear Relations will include the number of teeth for each input gear, thus insuring that the two rotate at the correct relative rate.

Answers

  • adamohernadamohern Member, OS Professional Posts: 216 PRO
    Accepted Answer
    The approach is up to you. You can model each gear in its own part studio if that works well for your workflow, or you can model them all in a single part studio. It doesn't matter which.

    Ultimately you'll just import the gears as individual Parts into an Assembly, mate them to their respective axes using revolute mates, and mate them to one another using Gear Relations. The Gear Relations will include the number of teeth for each input gear, thus insuring that the two rotate at the correct relative rate.
  • ramon_hammramon_hamm Member Posts: 9
    Thank you! I'll paste your answer into my help notes. R.L.Hamm
  • adamohernadamohern Member, OS Professional Posts: 216 PRO
    You bet.
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