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Importing parts into Part Studio

mark_proulxmark_proulx Member Posts: 31
It does not appear to be possible to import parts, e.g., .stp files into a desired Part Studio.  Instead, it appears that one must create an assembly to permit their integration.  Is this true?  If so, what is the rationale behind this architecture?  I find it profoundly frustrating.

Comments

  • owen_sparksowen_sparks Member, Developers Posts: 2,145 PRO
    Yes and no, you can't directly import them into an existing target part studio, but you can "derive" them into your part studio once you've imported them.  (So no need to use an assembly, but 2 steps, import then derive, rather than just one.)  Does that make sense?  If not please shout.
    Cheers, Owen S,
    Production Engineer
    HWM-Water Ltd
  • mark_proulxmark_proulx Member Posts: 31
    Thanks, Owen. The extra step is no big deal.  I just find it so much easier to manipulate parts in a studio than in an assembly.  I'm sure that this is in large measure due to my lack of experience, but I gotta tell ya that I've lost count of how many times I've been in an assembly and wanted to reach right into the monitor to grab a part and move it where I want!

  • owen_sparksowen_sparks Member, Developers Posts: 2,145 PRO
    edited January 17
    No worries, I've been at the screaming at the monitor stage myself on occasion, but less so with Onshape than other software usually.

    At the risk of being patronising a couple of suggestions in broad terms for when starting out:-

    (a) Assemblies are good for showing parts that move, and for designs that have many copies of the same part (termed instancing).  If your design doesn't need that then it's fine to stay in the part studio for a while.

    (b) Moving stuff in the part studio (using transform tool).  There are many favours but I'd get to grips with "by xyz", by "line or points" and "by mate connector" first.  This will cover 90% of what you want to do.  By far the most powerful is the "by mate connector" option as it will move and rotate a part, or many parts, all in one operation.  It also leads nicely into the assembly methods later...

    (c) Assembly moving has a couple of options.  The "triad" just click on a part and you have a minipulator icon that will slide a part in a straight line in xyz, or rotate it in abc.  Handy for simple stuff but mate connectors are where the real power is.  Once you get the hang of them you'll wonder how you ever lived without them!

    (d) More important than any on that is making use of the resources available.  The online help is pretty good, the learning centre is good (despite Americans not knowing how to spell centre) but best of all the free online webinars are great.  I learned more there than anywhere else.  It's listen only mode so no pressure, just soak up the experience from the onshape folks.  I discovered better workflows and things I hadn't realised were possible there, where as with the help you often need to know what you're looking for in advance.

    (e) Make use of us in the forum, we're a friendly bunch that like to help.  All we ask is that you follow these suggestions:- clicky Unlike some companies you'll also find a bunch of Onshape staff here.  Please make sure you abuse them. :)

    Have fun.
    Owen S.


    Production Engineer
    HWM-Water Ltd
  • mark_proulxmark_proulx Member Posts: 31
    Owen:

    My biggest problem is that I'm an intermittent user.  I jump in, do a project, then don't return for an extended period.  As a result, I spend most of my time at the steep initial stage of the learning curve.  It was the same way when I was working (I'm retired now), where we used specialized structural dynamics software that was pretty cryptic.  If you didn't have your nose stuck in it all the time, you were destined to struggle. By comparison, my problems here are not nearly as daunting.

    It is my mission to get increasingly comfy with mate connectors. Thus far, I've found them to be an annoyance, but willingly concede this to my inexperience. 

    I never pose a question to the forum without trying to work it out via the online help!

    Thanks again!

    Mark
  • owen_sparksowen_sparks Member, Developers Posts: 2,145 PRO
    Hi Mark,
    Owen:

    My biggest problem is that I'm an intermittent user.  I jump in, do a project, then don't return for an extended period.  As a result, I spend most of my time at the steep initial stage of the learning curve. 
    I understand.  At first 90% of the mental effort goes into driving the software with the last 10% left over for the actual design process.  It gets easier :)

    I never pose a question to the forum without trying to work it out via the online help!
    That's appreciated, many don't! That said if you're banging your head after 10-15 mins please speak up, that's what this place is all about after all!

    Cheers, Owen S.
    Production Engineer
    HWM-Water Ltd
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