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Pro tip assembly part orientation

Ben_Ben_ OS Professional, Mentor, Developers Posts: 281 PRO
So I want to have my models square to the world. In an assembly this can be a challenge. So my tip is to insert a part and fix it (maybe make a dummy cube), then reference that part to orient one part by using a fasten mate. Fix the part you have just moved, delete the mate and then unfix and delete the dummy part or unfix the original fixed part. Delete the dummy if necessary and voila!
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2jg86-MLAyFZll5Yl9hODkyUVU/edit?usp=sharing

Comments

  • andy_morrisandy_morris Moderator, Onshape Employees Posts: 87
    Awesome tip Ben!
    I presume that you would prefer to have some reference geometry to mate to instead?
    If so, what types would you like?
    Andy Morris / Head of Product Design / Onshape, Inc.
  • Ben_Ben_ OS Professional, Mentor, Developers Posts: 281 PRO
    Planes, origin, and ability to make axis lines would be helpful
  • kevin_quigleykevin_quigley Member Posts: 306 ✭✭✭
    Mate to axes lines, mate to points....or mate to virtual or inferred planes/axes, does anyone do that?
  • Ben_Ben_ OS Professional, Mentor, Developers Posts: 281 PRO
  • caradoncaradon OS Professional, Mentor Posts: 300 PRO
    edited September 2014

    Mate to axes lines, mate to points....or mate to virtual or inferred planes/axes, does anyone do that?

    I do that all the time in SolidWorks! I much prefer mating reference geometry over mating actual geometry. If the face definition changes -for whatever reason- the mating reference for that face will blow up. Mating reference geometry is also more robust for revisions of parts that exist in many, many different assemblies. For bottom-up design, mating reference geometry can be a life saver...
    Aligning origins is also a good thing for master modeling techniques.

    This is all true for the strictly parametric world. In IronCAD I couldn't care less about mating conditions.

    Dries
    This Ticket has been deleted from Zendesk
This discussion has been closed.