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How to mate tapered roller bearings

joe_dunnejoe_dunne Onshape Employees, Developers Posts: 161


OK this has come up a few time. So I figured I would show how to use Onshape Mates to assemble the common tapered surface situation. In Onshape we do not have a contact surface. You need to think about how/where the Mate connector goes.



in the case of a tapered roller bearing. Assuming all taper angles are equal to each other, then all you have to do is locate the apex of the taper for each part. then its very simple to assemble the part using a revolute mate.

Here is a Document that shows how to assemble a typical tapered cone. (The key is the ability to use sketch geometry to place a mate connector._

https://cad.onshape.com/documents/807e1c7fc3594af09fd6f7c4/w/c3d3a61ecd5842f99111d659




Joe Dunne / Onshape, Inc.

Comments

  • Ed_DanzerEd_Danzer Member, Mentor Posts: 13
    Since the bearing is only an electronic representation of the purchased bearing I recommend you position the mates to reflect the correct assembled length and concentric. This way you will know if the assembly has the correct spacing and adjustment range.
  • lougallolougallo Member, Moderator, Onshape Employees, Developers Posts: 1,923
    edited September 2014
    @EdDanzer‌ That would be done by adding a mate connector with the "move" option to set that distance and then @jdunne‌ approach would be the same. You would use that connector instead of the virtual point the two cones share.
    Lou Gallo / PD/UX - Support - Community / Onshape, Inc.
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