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Making changes to the array in the sketch.

sergei_nesterovsergei_nesterov Member Posts: 40 ✭✭
In sketch mode, I make an array. Several array elements are added to my drawing (centerlines, callouts with the number of copies, object duplicates). But then I notice that I forgot to draw or add a line to the array. Is it possible to edit (add, delete) array elements?

Comments

  • mahirmahir Member, Developers Posts: 1,116 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Is it possible to edit (add, delete) array elements?
    Not to my knowledge. Sketch tools like patterns and offsets aren't really editable features. You can change dimensions, but not the original setup parameters/elements. Your best bet is to recreate the pattern. Alternatively, if you have items attached to your existing pattern instances, you can create a separate pattern just for the missing line.
  • lanalana Onshape Employees Posts: 597
    @sergei_nesterov
    if you want benefits of parametric modeling, try working with Face Pattern in solid body. There you can make changes to the seed and adjust pattern selections to handle them.
  • alnis_smidchensalnis_smidchens Member Posts: 299 EDU
    @billy2 if you think that sketch is scary...




    This is one of those cases where I was modeling something as fast as possible with zero regards to maintainability (it was a competition to make a complete CAD model for a robot in only a few days). Ultimately, it looked right and regenerated, so...

    Of course, I would never do this on an actual project! I just needed the model to look right haha
    Get in touch: [email protected] | My personal site: https://alnis.dev | My YouTube channel (I make tutorial videos for Onshape & Inventor): https://www.youtube.com/c/AlnisSmidchens
  • Evan_ReeseEvan_Reese Member Posts: 834 PRO
    edited August 2020
    @billy2 if you think that sketch is scary...




    This is one of those cases where I was modeling something as fast as possible with zero regards to maintainability (it was a competition to make a complete CAD model for a robot in only a few days). Ultimately, it looked right and regenerated, so...

    Of course, I would never do this on an actual project! I just needed the model to look right haha
    lol! the stuff of nightmares!

    At Fractal we actually have internal parlance for this. Level 1 CAD is for exploration and is as fast as possible, but is a pain to edit. Level 2 is for iteration on a single direction, level 3 is ultra tidy for final execution. It's really helpful to be able to just say, "this is a level 2", and everyone knows what that means. Your example is level 1 for sure.
    Evan Reese / Principal and Industrial Designer with Ovyl
    Website: ovyl.io
    Instagram: @evan.reese.designs
  • billy2billy2 Member, OS Professional, Mentor, Developers, User Group Leader Posts: 1,537 PRO
    edited August 2020
    guys I couldn't sleep last night. 

    Look guys you have a pattern on plate, I get it.

    But, think about this which happens all the time. You're working on someone's stuff not knowing the model and trying to make a change. Most will click on a face to find the feature that made that face.



    And then:


    Breaking up the design and managing it so the next guy can understand how you built it, easily pick up your design intent & ultimately make a change. This is the goal.

    There's too many models in the world that are impossible to work with and it doesn't have to be that way. Build'm for the next guy.

    It's a broad statement "no more than 10 sketch entities" but it helps get new users to break up their features into manageable chunks.

    But, then of course, there's exceptions to the rule. Possibly a nasty pattern in a sheet metal part.


  • billy2billy2 Member, OS Professional, Mentor, Developers, User Group Leader Posts: 1,537 PRO
    edited August 2020
    @Evan_Reese that's so true what you said about the evolution of a design and how Fractal's project structure is setup. I wish more design houses were this organized. Designs metamorphize during evolution. I'm interested in how you keep all 3 approaches, can you?. There's engineering layouts and then there's released documentation. Can they both exist with one driving the other?


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